Read Birmingham 1963: How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support by Shelley Tougas Online

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In May 1963 news photographer Charles Moore was on hand to document the Children's Crusade, a civil rights protest. But the photographs he took that day did more than document an event; they helped change history. His photograph of a trio of African-American teenagers being slammed against a building by a blast of water from a fire hose was especially powerful. The image oIn May 1963 news photographer Charles Moore was on hand to document the Children's Crusade, a civil rights protest. But the photographs he took that day did more than document an event; they helped change history. His photograph of a trio of African-American teenagers being slammed against a building by a blast of water from a fire hose was especially powerful. The image of this brutal treatment turned Americans into witnesses at a time when hate and prejudice were on trial. It helped rally the civil rights movement and energized the public, making civil rights a national problem needing a national solution. And it paved the way for Congress to finally pass laws to give citizens equal rights regardless of the color of their skin....

Title : Birmingham 1963: How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support
Author :
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ISBN : 9780756543983
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 64 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Birmingham 1963: How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support Reviews

  • Chalida
    2019-03-20 11:13

    This is a very quick read. I picked it up during independent reading in a non-fiction class and was immersed in it for 35 minutes. I found it fascinating how this one photo by Charles Moore had such a profound effect on the world and the story of Carolyn Maull, the girl in the photo, is such a great way to hook our students into activism by learning about the Children's Crusade--children were going to be the change-makers; the adults were afraid of losing their jobs, but children didn't have jobs. This quick, informational read would be a great way to build schema and develop search terms for further research into the Civil Rights Movement.

  • Ashley
    2019-03-25 11:27

    Grade/Interest Level: 6-8Lexile Level: 970LGenre: Information Text, BiographyMain Characters:NoneSetting: Birmingham, AL 1963POV: Third PersonTougas utilizes the photographs taken by Charles Moore of the Children's Crusade in Birmingham, AL. To aid in the photographs, she uses text to explain the mood, injustices and experiences of the people of Birmingham during that time. The photos demonstrate multiple real life pictures of African American youth being brutalized and beaten by cops and white citizens. The cover photo is a brutal picture of three African American teens being hosed down by white officers. The text adds the background knowledge to accompany these photos, which gained national attention and led to some legislation that protected the rights of African Americans.I would use these photos as a way to discuss the Civil Rights movement, and children's involvement during this time. I would also have discussions about whether or not the text serves as primary or secondary sources. Majority of the photos evoke strong emotional feelings, thus I would allow students to express how the photos make them feel, and why these incidents are wrong and immoral.

  • Barbara
    2019-02-25 08:20

    The Children's Crusade in Birmingham gets its just due in this book, another title in the Captured History series, as the author focuses on a compelling photograph by Charles Moore. Moore was on the scene when Birmingham firefighters used high pressure hoses to keep the young marchers at bay. The author provides background about the civil rights movement, including the fact that quiet protests didn't garner much attention even though they might have been effective. A photograph showing three youngsters, including fourteen-year-old Carolyn Maull, getting blasted with the water from the hoses became a turning point for the civil rights movement as the rest of the nation became ashamed of the city's treatment of its citizens. It just might be that without the attention the photograph brought to what was happening in Birmingham, it might have taken much longer to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Who can help but marvel at the influence of one image that changed how the nation regarded civil rights?

  • Mary
    2019-03-05 11:17

    The famous, compelling, and dramatic black and white photos of photographer Charles Moore truly captured a snapshot of the time, the modern American civil rights movement of the 1950s. Author Tougas does a masterful job of weaving the story for the young reader around these photos of the civil rights marches in Birmingham, Ala.,where many children marched, bringing much attention to the injustice of racial segregation in our nation, Albany, Ga. and the Birmingham church bombing by the KKK where four young girls died while preparing for church services. Young readers who want to learn about the people who marched for equal rights for all, non-segregation, and the Civil Rights leaders of the time will find lots of valuable information. Great information for report writing or just learning about this historically eventful time. Book includes timeline, Glossary, Source Notes, Bibliography, Index. A great addition to the library and classroom shelf.

  • Paul
    2019-02-24 16:20

    Story surrounding the photograph taken in Birmingham, Alabama, by Charles Moore that contributed to the growing momentum of the Civil Rights Movement and flared national awareness to the discrimination in the US. One of a series on photographs that had disproportionate impact. Moore's photograph of three African American teenagers being fire-hosed is iconic and appeared in Life magazine, raising national awareness of brutality, especially striking in response to the Children's Crusade in Birmingham. Tougas's narrative s helpful in providing background to events in the city, the growing national Civil Rights movement, the movement's leaders, the lessons they learned on the use of media as a result of Moore's photographs, and Carolyn Maull (the only one of the three whose identity is known).

  • Christy
    2019-02-24 11:02

    Interesting introduction to the Civil Rights and how Charles Moore's photograph helped inform the country on what was going on in Birmingham. The book is geared towards late elementary to early middle school, I would say. It is often repetitive, but through that it drills it in your head some of the more important points of the non-fiction book. I definitely liked all the photographs to get a sense of what was going on in the 1960s. Also liked the time-line in the back for readers to view the events leading up to the photo from the Children's Crusade and ending with the laws against segregation.

  • Gloria Green
    2019-03-15 14:21

    Having met Carolyn Maull last last year at the 50th anniversary of walking the Edmund Pettis Bridge, this book became a very personal link with me. This is a brave woman who as an "ordinary" girl, impacted the civil rights movement in ways she didn';t realize at the time. But isn't that what history is? Making changes never come announced; they occur to those who are willing to be the change-makers.Carolyn McKinstry is truly one of those .......

  • Nathalie
    2019-03-20 16:19

    Picked this up at the National Civil Rights Museum on a recent trip to Memphis. It's a very condensed and simplified explanation (probably written for young teens) of the role of the media in the movement. A quick and fascinating read!

  • Sarah
    2019-02-24 13:21

    While this book had good intentions, I think it would have been better with another title and a tighter focus. Is the focus of this book the entire civil rights movement? A place? A year? A photograph? I found it to be a bit of a mish mash

  • Tena Edlin
    2019-03-08 16:01

    This brief overview of the Civil Rights movement highlights the importance of photographs in swaying public opinion. Powerful images.

  • Stella
    2019-03-11 13:23

    It must have been tough, what the blacks were going through at that time

  • Wesley
    2019-03-23 09:28

    This is a truly great book. The premise was lacking but it was very informative. I didn't the governor did what he did. The 9 kids were very brave and strong. They were civil rights heroes